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Measuring the space

30.06 - 31.08.2020
  • Daniel Buren
    Triptyque électrique – Vert, 2012-2014
    Optical fiber
    339.3x113.1 cm
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  • “This sequence of stripes alternating white and color of a particular width – 8.7 cm – is only the stable element that I have used without exception since 1965. But that does not mean that I will always use it. Everything else in my work – from the ideas to the materials themselves (wood, linen, paper, glass, etc.) – is constantly changing, depending on the purpose, time and location. I don’t know why this dimension is used all over the world, but it never creates an optical illusion and 8.7 cm is supposedly the approximate distance between the eyes in an apparently normal human being. I like it, but not because of the scientific explanation. And I continue to use this dimension because it allows me to measure any space or surface that I mark with this measurement without using any other tool than my eyes”.

    Daniel Buren

  • Daniel Buren
    1/2 Cercle doublé mais rayé - Blue, 2016
    Mirrors, paint
    Site specific installation 
    252.3 x 252.3 cm mirrors, 25 elements
    252.3x126 cm paint
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  • Paolo Icaro
    Intervallo, 2012
    Plaster
    11x52.5x5.5 cm
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  • “For Icaro, as mentioned, the material is nothing more than “the direct consequence of the development of the idea”. In Soffio, whose first example was made in 1975, he uses plaster to give his breath in the material. A fragile mixture of dust and water, gypsum is chosen for its propensity to act on time, for its ability to trap the moment, for its vocation to situate experience in a never-ending, where everything is interrogated, where materiality and immateriality re-actualize their relationship in their dialectical activation”.

    Lara Conte

  • Paolo Icaro
    Soffio, 2007
    Plaster
    28 x 43 x 3 cm
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  • Giulio Paolini
    Vedo (la decifrazione del mio campo visivo), 2003
    Canvas, plexiglass showcase, photograph, black pastel, collage on wall
    225 x 374cm
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  • Two plaster casts of the bust of the Hermes of Praxiteles are placed opposite each other, slightly staggered so that the two looks meet.
    The work marks Paolini’s first use of the cast of ancient sculpture. Echo of an absent model and a distant, mythical image, the cast is a privileged tool for the artist to establish the implicit difference to language, therefore to the very concept of mimesis: “the intent is to grasp – leaving it intact – the distance that separates us from those images, but which, at the same time, makes us visible”.
    “When I put two identical specimens of the same ancient sculpture facing each other, I don’t want to be the creator of the rediscoverer of those sculptures, but the observer who captures the distance that divides them, therefore all the possibilities of relationship or absence of relationship that are determined between them, and between that image and us”.

  • Giulio Paolini
    Mimesi, 1975
    Plaster
    38.7 x 17.5 x 24.5 cm
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  •  

    Three different attitudes for examining the space are presented through the work of three artists of the same generation.
    Daniel Buren has crossed the entire world with his iconic signature. His sequences of stripes of alternating colours and materials are used to explore the notion of measure since the beginning of the ’60s.
    In a different way, Paolo Icaro focuses his attention on the construction/deconstruction of the surrounding space using his body as a measuring tool. He explores the becoming of a sculpture that turns into inhabitable space.
    Giulio Paolini creates complex spaces where different forces merge: citation, duplication and fragmentation, which are the expedients for staging the distance between a finished model, for making the work a theatre of evocation. To accompany his articulated constructions, a vast archive of cultural mythologies and memories from the classical age.

     

  • Daniel Buren
    Frise - Cuivre, 2018
    Copper and wall
    43.5 x 704.5 cm
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  • “Daniel Buren was the first artist I visited before opening the gallery. I went to Paris, asked him to do a show. He said, “Open your gallery, send me the invitations, I’ll look at what you do, and in three years I’ll tell you whether I want to work with you or not…” He called me about a year later. He must have liked what he saw. Since then, we’ve come a long way together, and he’s been one of the artists with the biggest influence on my projects. He taught me to think about the works in relation to the space that’s there, to mount the shows in accordance with the artist’s wishes, to respect the rules they lay down. He taught me that the gallery is a neutral space, open to housing very different kinds of work; he convinced me that the gallery is not in the four walls around us, but in our heads”.

    Massimo Minini

  • Paolo Icaro
    Anima nuda, 1985
    Painted bronze and glass
    191.5x61.5x37.5 cm ca
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  • “I met Paolo Icaro in the mid-‘70s, well after his Arte Povera period with the shows in Genoa at Galleria La Bertesca, in Bern and Amsterdam with Szeemann, at Galleria della Tartaruga in Rome with Prini. We exchanged an impressive number of letters in the days before computers. He lived in America, and we’d write to each other every week. I saw him announce the birth of plaster many years before the unfinished approach became popular in the work of Franz West. The shift from polished steel to rough plaster is justified in a beautiful series of letters that I’d like to publish one day (maybe with my replies, if Paolo still has them in some drawer).
    The nom d’art that he found (he was dubbed Icaro by his teacher Umberto Mastroianni in Turin) sums up the essence of this important artist, doomed to fall as in the myth. Paolo flies high in the sky of sculpture, but too close to the sun, his wings burn, and down he plummets.
    But this Icarus, like Sisyphus, always starts over again, in the thick of it—in the thick of that plaster he loves so much—that plaster which is the place where hands touch matter and leave the most direct possible sign of the sculptor’s will”.

    Massimo Minini

  • Giulio Paolini
    Empedocle, 1980
    Mirror, golden lamé fabric, plaster cast
    Mirror diameter: 80 cm
    Cast: 9 x 28 x 16 cm
    Overall dimensions variable
    Edition of 6
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  • “Giulio Paolini is the artist who has influenced me the most. Of late, his practice of understatement, of stepping aside, of avoiding muscular self- aggrandizement, has truly won me over. Perhaps I indirectly owe my fondness for presenting groups of small works (small is good) to his way of thinking.
    I have an early piece that’s one of his highest achievements: almost nothing, just a gaze at the plane of vision, at eye level”.

    Massimo Minini